North Korea

Opinion: Continuing the Centennial Work of Women and Citizen Diplomacy in Korea

  By Christine Ahn | May 4, 2015 [Originally published by IPS, NEW YORK, April 28, 2015] Christine Ahn is the International Coordinator of Women

Anatomy of a Hatchet Job: Regarding Women Cross DMZ in CNN’s Situation Room

By Gregory Elich* | April 20, 2015 [Originally published by MRZine | April 11, 2015] A television news program opens with a clip of marching

The Unending Korean War: W.E.B Du Bois, Ko Un, and the Women’s Peace Walk

By John R. Eperjesi* | April 20, 2015 [Originally published by TheWorldPost | April 15, 2015] May 24, 2015 is International Women’s Day for Disarmament.

In South Korea, Preaching Peace
Is Now a Deportable Offense

A Korean American Housewife Confronts South Korea’s National Security Law By Hyun Lee* | January 27, 2015 Originally published in Foreign Policy in Focus and

Stranger than Fiction: The Interview and
U.S. Regime-Change Policy Toward North Korea

By Christine Hong | December 28, 2014 Originally published in the Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus “And if it does start a war, hopefully people will

Fact Not Fiction: The Unending Korean War

By Christine Ahn and Suzy Kim | December 24, 2014 Copyright, Truthout.org. Reprinted with permission The fact that the Korean War ended with a temporary

Alleged North Korean Cyber-attack and
“The Interview”

KPI | December 22, 2014 Recently, KPI Board Member Christine Hong and KPI Advisory Board members Christine Ahn and Tim Shorrock spoke on the issues

Remembering a War Within the Korean War

By John R. Eperjesi* | December 22, 2014 [Originally published in the Huffington Post, December 10, 2014] In Paul Yoon’s new novel Snow Hunters (2013),

DPRK Human Rights Briefing at U.N. Challenges U.S. Unending War Strategy

By Ronda Hauben* | November 4, 2014 [Originally published in taz.blogs, October 14, 2014] The briefing held at the United Nations by the Democratic People’s

Human Rights: When North Korea Speaks,
Part 1

Editors note: Human rights have all too often served less as a neutral vocabulary to describe North Korea’s conditions than as an instrument of power